Post Secondary 30 years later

AbnormalPsychologytextThose of you who know me off the Interweb know that last July I started taking courses as a part-time student. I enrolled at Vancouver Community College. I tentatively stuck my big toes across a classroom’s threshold to begin to gather prerequisites to eventually apply to a Masters in Counselling Psychology hoping to be accepted at one of BC’s universities somewhere in the vicinity of Fall 2016 or thereabouts.

That first classroom experience was excellent. The instructor was lively and animated. She was a woman who had returned to school herself just years before. My fellow students were an eclectic mix of people with former degrees, McWorkers, recovering addicts, and those, like me, who have overcome their own traumas and dramas and reasons for needing to seek counselling. They were a super lively bunch who ranged in age from mid 20s to late 50s. It was a great class! Had that experience been less than it was, I am not sure I’d be continuing on this journey.

At that same time, I enrolled in the six month Graduate Manuscript Workshop via SFU Writer’s Studio taught by Wayde Compton. I must say that writing and exploring writing, especially nonfiction if it’s related to personal history, fits really well with taking courses in counselling. The trick is to figure out how to keep writing when my focus is so dispersed.

Content of the courses aside, these new endeavours are proving to be most interesting not just because of what I’m learning but what I’m observing about the different campuses. I feel like a mystery student, akin to a mystery shopper, dropping in to VCC and Douglas, returning to SFU’s downtown campus and who knows, maybe I’ll cherry-pick another pre-requisite online from Athabasca. I feel like I should be carrying around a little clipboard taking notes of all the things these post-secondary institutes are either doing really well or need to do better. There’s a lot of each to choose from.

This term, I managed, in spite of 18 people on a wait list, to get into a course I need at Douglas College and going there is a little more personally daunting. The biggest challenge is that everyone, as they should be, is right out of high school. I’m like, Mom’s here! I think back to when I was at SFU, right out of high school, and had I seen someone my age, I would have been confused, maybe even a little hostile. Why is she taking up a spot? I get it kids. I understand.

At VCC, small classes are the norm, 20 people or thereabouts. I really like that. The instructors actually know every student’s name. The counselling courses are very interactive, obviously, and fellow students become practice clients which isn’t ideal in terms of boundaries but the most viable option. You get to know people. You feel a part of something.

At Douglas, there must be at least 35 people in the class and the instructor just finished teaching the same thing to a different section right before. Give the guy a gold star… or maybe some drugs! How do you talk in front of people, repeating the same thing, in the same afternoon-evening for more than 6 hours and not start to sound like a crazy person? He managed to stay incredibly articulate. Kudos to him. Still, the whole instructor at front lecturing seems so 1980. There’s got to be a better way. Luckily, they seemed to have improved the text book, complete with Canadian references no less. I opened to a page and a photo of a guy I was friends with as an undergrad, now a Psychiatry professor, was staring back at me. Shocking in both good and bad ways. I know too much. About him! I don’t want to see him looking back at me from a textbook.

At the same time I’ve begun training to volunteer at the Vancouver Crisis Centre and can I just say there is probably no better training that I’ve experienced in terms of let’s ramp things up here and get into the psyche and psych-ache of BC. I was worried about doing it. How will volunteering there impact my own mental health? That’s yet to be determined. What I’ve learned there in the first two weeks of training has been equivalent to at least an entire semester at any course I’ve ever taken, and more.

It’s been an exciting and intense start to the New Year. I’m guessing my brain is looking a little bit like that childhood toy, Lite-Brite.

“We are travelers on a cosmic journey, stardust, swirling and dancing in the eddies and whirlpools of infinity. Life is eternal. We have stopped for a moment to encounter each other, to meet, to love, to share. This is a precious moment. It is a little parenthesis in eternity.” – Paulo Coelho

Thank you to my friend Elaine for the quote this morning. It seems to fit.