travel

Talking the walking: one foot in front of the other & health

I guess I come by my love of walking honestly.

Infamously, I once took my father, who was in his 90th year at the time, on a walk around the Stanley Park seawall and we made it from my apartment at the bottom of Robson Street to a good chunk of the wall (about 6K) and finally dropping into our seats for lunch at the classic old Sylvia Hotel on English Bay.

After that day, every time I suggested he come downtown from Surrey for a visit, he’d immediately inquire with palpable consternation, “We’re not going to walk around the park, are we?” I may have traumatized him for life.  To set the record straight, I had given him more than one opportunity to do a shorter route, my concern present right from the start, but being the stubborn Scot he was, he had declined and past a certain point, there’s no turning back, no quick exit, no hailing a taxi.

Most of my father’s walking took place in the army during World War II and then later on, I gather, he did a lot of walking as part of his job as an electrician on the Rayonier site in New Westminster where, as an aside, in the 1960s, a huge fire broke out on August 20, 1966 in the grasses between the Scott Paper Company and Rayonier. That enormous blaze eventually ended up requiring the Mars Bomber to be deployed with that massive aircraft gathering tons of water from Sproat Lake near Port Alberni to drop on the fire in New West. I was five years old then, and I vaguely recall my brother and I being taken by my mother to watch the spectacle from a safe distance, awed by that huge aircraft flying so low overhead and dropping a veritable waterfall on the site.

In fact, it was my father’s good health and his Forrest Gump style of walks that eventually led to his decline. One day, he miscalculated the steepness of a hill, having taken a detour on some construction site, and ended up in Emergency thanks to whomever, some construction workers possibly, who found him.  In spite of his advanced age and having to stitch up gashes on his head, the ER folks never bothered to do a cat scan which then required, a second trip to Emergency later that day, a proper diagnosis of two hematomas and a six week hospital stay. This is a warning against walking down steep inclines, especially should you make it into your nineties. He was more fragile and cautious after his recovery, having to finally resort to using a dreaded walker on future outings.

Some of my favourite walks have taken place on B.C.’s Southern Gulf Islands. I loved my almost daily meandering jaunts down Walker Hook Road in the North End when I lived there. I’d leave the old cottage I’d rented off Hedger and take my time heading towards the Fernwood Dock admiring the view towards Trincomali Channel and the arbutus trees canvassing above the road, the wild flowers in the ditches. Surely, I thought, heaven must look and feel like the peace on that stretch of geography.

I’ve walked a fair amount on Mayne Island as well. From Miner’s Bay to the Lighthouse and back again and then down to Bennett Bay and I really believe that everyone should experience the absolute freedom and ability to be alone with their thoughts, as the breeze blows their hair, noting scents and scenes that would have been missed while riding in a car as their own two legs provide the only mobility.

I think about a long walk I did on the Isle of Mull in Scotland passing those hairy Highland cattle and inhaling the whiff of the salt off the Firth of Forth with Duart Castle being the daytrip’s destination.

I remember the beautiful city of Bath  and walking back to an Italianate mansion turned hostel on a hill through grassy fields that allowed an expansive view of the town and the weir below as the sun was setting.

Closer to home, my friend Dave Brent organized his friends to do some major walks and I recall the last steps of one of those that started near Value Village in Coquitlam, passed the Boulevard Casino, onto the area under the Port Mann Bridge, carrying on, and on the homestretch over the Pitt River Bridge where some cars had been parked to take the overheated back to the Gillnetter Pub on the Mary Hill Bypass because the pub at the end was always the point really. Two bridges in a single walk is one bridge too many for me.  He’s since ditched the walks for mega hikes all over the North Shore mountains and beyond.

When I saw this article posted by a friend on Facebook about an Irish neuroscientist named Shane O’ Mara, who has proven how good walking is, not just for the body but for the brain, he put into words, what every walker already knows and can now feel a little bit smug about.

Destinations de l’intuitif

Travel and deciding upon a destination has always been an intuitive exercise for me. I don’t so much as choose the place as it chooses me.

The first time that happened I was 19 years old, reading the Vancouver Sun newspaper, and I noticed a call to adventure appropriately named Youth on the Go. It was an exchange program with a difference — it was basically a one way adventure.  Nobody else was returning to my hometown with me when my time in the chosen place was over.

Youth from all over the world could go to another country and be hosted by a family for a few months. I ended up going to Finland to stay with the Kuisma family. Aspects of that trip are as clear in my memory now (as if the 38 years that have passed since) were just five or so years ago. It was a formative experience.

Many other trips since have unfolded that way as well.  I went to visit Ghost Ranch in Abiquiú, New Mexico, because I was intending to go to Santa Fe for the art and had never even heard of Ghost Ranch until it popped up in Google.  I poured over the words that shared the ranch’s history on my computer screen. The romanticism of how the late artist Georgia O’Keeffe first came to the ranch in 1929 or the early 1930s was so enchanting, as it has been to women the world over, that the more I read, the more I knew I must visit. And so I did. I went the first time in 2006, and loved the ranch so much, I went back the very next year taking the same photography course a second time.

My friends and family are often surprised. They won’t have even heard me refer to taking a trip and the next thing they know, I’m telling them “next week I’m going to __________ ” — insert name of place.

“Why there? Why now?” is how they react.

Sometimes it’s hard to answer.  It can seem on the surface like I’m Mary Poppins, the wind just seemingly blowing in the right direction to aid in whimsical decision-making. But what actually happens is the thought of a specific place may have been lingering just below the surface for a while being mulled about. Then that feeling in my chest grows stronger until I decide that I could, I know, I should, I must, I will, I am doing it and the ticket gets bought buoyed from a feeling of rightness.  Maybe that’s how it works for everyone.

I just returned from Quebec City and loved it. Five days seemed the perfect amount of time to learn more about the early history of Canada and to really understand better the uniqueness of Quebec and why they have so clung to their culture, their language, their history in the way they have, fighting for it every step of the way since Wolfe outwitted and overpowered Montcalm and all the political moves that have protected it since.

Visiting Quebec allows a Canadian (especially a life-long West Coaster) to better understand and be grateful for Quebec’s refusal to be anything but who they are, in their delicious food, in their language, their charming historic buildings and boulevards and outdoor cafes, the breeze and the scent of lilacs soothing on a hot day on the Plains of Abraham.

And you understand more about the power of the Roman Catholic Church in shaping almost everything historically in Quebec and building the infrastructure. You are awestruck by the monolithic Chateau Frontenac Hotel and its  significance to the city, its enterprise and beauty as it continued to evolve over decades right up to its last addition in 1993 (spa, pool, fitness room).

You learn about nuns like Marie de L ’Incarnation, founder of the Ursuline Order in Canada, in developing and educating the local young women, Indigenous girls and the King’s daughters, referencing the approximately 800 French women who immigrated to New France between 1663 and 1673.

And how these days, Quebecers, at least in Quebec City, are not interested in churches anymore which leave boards of directors scrambling for ways to make the beautiful old buildings financially viable, as the Monastery of Augustine nuns did, by transforming their monastery into a wellness centre complete with spa treatments, guest rooms and yoga and mindfulness retreats. https://monastere.ca/en

Before I went to Quebec City, I didn’t even realize it was a designated UNESCO World Heritage Centre because of the fortification walls around the old city and the gates still standing (with some having to be recreated).

And when I toured the Assembleé Nationale du Quebec on Saturday June 15th, I didn’t realize they were debating Bill 21, when the tour guide said “the Assembleé is in session today because there are two very important bills being debated.” She didn’t mention the nature of those bills. I believe the way she phrased it was, “Quebec wants to be sure that church and state are now separate.” Too bad, if that means a racist bill that prohibits someone who is Sikh or Muslim from wearing what should be a religious and cultural right and in the end will lessen the quality of life for everyone in that city whether they see that or not.

Whenever I travel, away from routine, get a taste of freedom and new sights to revel in,  I still dream of leaving it all and journeying the way many 20 years old do, for months at a time. If you have a twenty year old, and they are so inclined, don’t ever change their mind about travelling in favour of a job. There is time for routine. The twenties are the right time to explore and learn through seeing the world because as I age, I realize, there are few things (love being one of them) more important than the memories that have been made. Travel memories are happy and soothing companions.

Travel is also confidence re-affirming. When I’m able to find a destination that I wasn’t sure of or when I communicate ever so briefly in a language that isn’t English and I’m understood (with help from Google Translate) I feel so much personal mastery that the words of that old Helen Reddy song, ‘I am woman, hear me roar!’ ring through my head and bring a small smile to my heart.

I love being able to do exactly what I want or to choose not to do something in the tourist guide because I don’t care. I don’t have to wait for someone to keep up with me. I can stop to eat when I’m hungry or walk 22,000 step in one day.  I can have conversations with the cute 20-something waiter who makes enough money in Quebec City in the summer to travel the rest of the year or the couple from Spain at the next table. In that way, the experience comes to life and brings me back to the liveliness of my non workday self. I become who I truly am in curiosity and energy.

And that’s another thing that travel brings to the forefront: clarity. A streamlined clearness about what is and isn’t working in my  life, about what really matters to me now, and about what needs to change.

To use a phrase from 1967 uttered (some said inappropriately given his position and that he was a guest in our country) by past French President Charles de Gaulle: Vive le Quebec! And I definitely want to add to that: Vive le voyage!

The Big Island Version 3.0

I made a spontaneous decision to go to the big island of Hawai’i before Christmas. I felt mentally tired, had the vacation time, and going to the Big Island is an easy trip for me, given that it’s the third time I’ve been there.

It’s a bit like going to the tropical version of Salt Spring I know it so well. The weather was perfect, not too hot for a Canadian because it is their winter after all. It wasn’t crowded and I was told that the volcanic eruption of Kilauea in the summer had really impacted tourism, especially in Hilo and in the village of Volcano. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park had just re-opened (but not fully) in September.

My favourite thing about the Big Island is the diversity of landscapes from volcanoes to tropical gardens to waterfalls, lush green valleys and even pasture land up in Waimea country. You can go snorkelling or take a surf lesson. Whether you want to go out on one of the tours such as Fairwinds or BodyGlove or you just want to catch the trolley that goes along Ali’i Drive to go to the family friendly easy snorkelling beach of Kahhalu’u Beach park it’s up to you. From sea turtles to coffee plantations to golf to snorkelling with Manta Rays at night if that’s your thing, to taking tours of octopus and seahorse farms or just learning about the Hawaiian heritage and local arts and crafts such as the kapa quilt patterns in the quilt museum in Kona or about the history of Tsunamis at the little museum in Hilo. There’s touristy Hawaii in Kona village and the long strip of shops which keeps things interesting and there is not so touristy old Hawaii out in the rural areas.  Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden is one of the most stunning tropical gardens you’ll ever see and not to be missed. This time I found this unique and aptly named Peace Garden at the end of Painted Church Road. It was spectacular, perched high above Kealakekua Bay.

Because I’ve already seen most of the tourist things from my first and second trip, this was going to be just a more hanging out kind of trip. I wasn’t even going to rent a car until I realized, you have to rent a car if you’re going to go to the Big Island and not get stuck in Kona. So I caved, rented one for two days, and that was just enough to get me out to the Place of Refuge which is one of my favourite places and I dropped into the Painted Church. I also wanted to take a quick trip back up the hill behind Kona to Holualoa, a funky little place with some good artists’ shops. I also made the longer drive up to Waikoloa, and went to the spectacular Kua beach on the way back on an incredibly blustery day where the waves were frothing and flashing.

One day, I went to a beach area that a lot of tourists would probably just pass by because it doesn’t look like it would be very nice when you’re looking towards the ocean from the highway. But it’s really nice, runs for miles and it’s almost deserted. There were some locals surfing farther out. It’s only about a 20 minute drive North from Kona.

I was walking along when I spotted this guy peering intently into the water, poised to pounce with his net to catch fish the old fashioned way. I was slightly bemused. It looked like I’d stumbled upon some episode of Survivor. But that’s me being dismissive of long held traditions that actually work. Unfortunately, they didn’t work for him that day. No fish caught!

He came into shore and we started chatting. In no time at all, he offered me a beer. I thought about it for about 30 seconds and said, Okay. Sure. Why not. I was thirsty after all. And I put my towel down and we watched the fishing boat that had been trolling back and forth farther out and we talked about this and that and nothing really. I asked him how old he was. He asked me how young I was. His choice of words told me a lot about him. And then he asked me if I’d like some dried Ahi tuna. It’s great with beer, he said, and it was.

I like those kind of interactions while on vacation. They seem so pure. A mutual understanding that it’s a human connection made without expectations except sharing of realities and soaking up the other person’s energy. I really liked his energy. For all I know, he could have been homeless. He had a pretty wrecked Mazda truck. He didn’t have a job. He’d worked previously for 18 years at Holualoa Coffee Company. He had two kids.

Those kinds of interactions make traveling alone the adventure it can be.

I’ve been pondering Albert upon my return. We sat there for about 45 minutes that day and then when we parted he took my hand and we looked into each others eyes and there was a real connection there. I wanted to give him a hug but I didn’t. I’m thinking Hawaiian hospitality has to be pretty renowned and he did his nationality proud that day.

He told me where he lived and said I should drop in before I leave if I wanted to. But I didn’t. I’d be gone in less than a day.

Everything that mattered for me was in the moment.

Camino de no thank you

The only person I know to have walked the Camino de Santiago was an acquaintance from The SFU Writer’s Studio, Barb Kmiec. Before I heard a few stories from Barb, it was something I thought I might like to do one day.  I was impressed that a) she did it alone, and b) she survived it. I’m not positive she did the entire route, but I do believe she did complete enough of it to get the certificate.  After hearing about it, I made a decision right then that I could check off this quasi-desire and label it, Camino de no thank you.

The walking appeals to me. The hordes of peregrinos (pilgrims) and the sleeping options would preclude my taking the first step. Not to mention that lately, my weak right ankle, (an old basketball injury), and one crooked toe that I’m guessing has some minor arthritis, would have to get sorted out. The thought of sleeping in a room full of others, in a bad bunk, after a day of walking 15-25 km, reminded me of the worst hosteling experience I had in London in 2001 and in Edinburgh somewhere on the Royal Mile.

In London, just after arriving, wide-eyed and a little overwhelmed because I hadn’t stayed in a hostel for a long time at that point, I was kept awake all night by man in the bunk above me. He was non-stop snoring. He didn’t speak English. We couldn’t communicate and we were the only ones in the two-bunk room. This went on for three nights. By the third evening, I was practically homicidal. I’m not sure why it never occurred to me to just ask for a different room. Duh!

I do not want to re-experience that or sleep in a room full of people in an uncomfortable bed that thousands of others have slept in before me. I do not want to deal with disgusting, painful blisters to do a pilgrimage that, from a spiritual perspective, I don’t really know at this point why I’d do, and for me, the spiritual, not the physical, would be the point, although I gather they’re inextricably linked.

I’m telling you this because last weekend I found myself ordering a small guidebook, Camino Francés, written by Bryson Guptill, from P.E.I., that I’d seen referenced recently on social media. I’ll call it a no frills guide. You can read it in a night or less. You’ll get the route he took with tips, some photos, and exact GPS-plotted distances. If you’re looking to whet your appetite, this could be one book to have in your arsenal. I do have to give a warning about the quality of its binding however. It would probably not survive more than a few days in a pack. Maybe he’ll rethink that on the next printing and use a cerlox bind instead.

“Are you going to walk the Camino this year?” he asked me in an e-mail that he wrote back to me when I ordered the book.

‘No,’ I said. ‘Not this year. Probably not at all. But just in case.’

And it was that part of the sentence, ‘just in case’ and the fact that it had popped out of my mouth, [where the heck did that come from?], that left me both curious and a little worried. I mean, that I actually took the time to order the book did not escape my curious attention either.

Then yesterday morning after reading his book, I was up, unintentionally,  way too early, and I decided I must re-watch, The Way, with Martin Sheen. But it wasn’t to be found on Netflix.  Instead, I came across another film, Footprints: The path of your life, a documentary about 10 American guys led by a young Catholic priest from Arizona. I thought it was really good because of its focus on spirituality (in this case Catholicism) and besides you don’t often see a movie about 10 guys, with at least one who’d had some major losses to overcome, make it happen.

At some point, past the halfway mark, the group realized that the slowest members had to come first, regardless of how slow they might be. Halfway through they found a unique solution for making that happen on the major inclines. You’ll have to watch it to discover what that was. Apparently seven of the 10, just in case you’re still romanticizing such a trip, had to seek medical attention during the 40 day experience (this little tidbit runs quietly across the screen at the end of the movie).

I couldn’t stop thinking of my friend Dave Brent when I watched it  For all I know, he’s way ahead of me and he’s in training for it with all the walks he leads around the Lower Mainland as a secret warm up.  Dave, are you holding out on us as to your ultimate walking motivation?

So just wondering, how many of you secretly desire to do the Camino de Santiago? Have you already done it? Got any unique tips?

The fastest trip to Japan from Vancouver

I spent most of this past weekend at the Powell Street Festival which has got to be one of the best entertainment deals in Vancouver taking place at Oppenheimer Park and the streets around it with events at the Firehall Arts Centre, the Japanese Language School, and the Vancouver Buddhist Temple.

This area was home to the largest concentration of Japanese people in Vancouver prior to WWII before they were banished from the West Coast in Canada and the U.S. as a result of Japan’s bombing of Pearl Harbour and a build up, prior to that, of racism and fear-mongering.

I had to get my little fix of Takoyaki (Osaka Balls),  those tasty street vendor treats that instead of the traditional style which are filled with octopus, these are filled with shrimp and scallops, a creamy middle with a crunchy deep-fried outer and with fish shavings on top. I stayed traditional but you can get the wasabi version or with mayo. 

So many interesting offerings  at The Firehall Arts Centre. We were introduced to a HAPA comic from L.A., Katie Malia and her Almost Asian vignettes which are being picked up by Netflix in the near future.

Listened to Dr. Asato Ikeda from Japan talk about a Third Gender in early modern Japan, a spin off from an exhibit at the ROM in 2016 A Third Gender: Beautiful Youths in Japanese prints. Descriptions of wakashu or boys between the ages of 12-18 who fulfilled the pleasures of men and women and how to hear about that part of cultural history in Japan without imposing contemporary North American values on that part of Japanese history which has been kept under wraps mostly because, if I understood the speaker correctly, of how it fits into the Kabuki theatre in the Edo period. Since Kabuki has been designated the official theatre of Japan, there’s a reluctance to acknowledge the roots of it in this expression of sexuality. Super interesting!

Introduced to two men (both Gaijin or caucasian) Jay Rubin and Ted Goossen, Americans who are elders in the translation of Japanese literature. They spoke about the novelist Haruki Murakami and mostly that stood out for me because it’s always amazing to me how some people just fall into their professions without any effort on their part and that becomes their entire life.

Admired that Joy Kogawa who is looking very fit and in her eighties was open to participating in an experimental performance that included her poetry, a young Hapa poet Soramaru Takayama and a wonderful mime (whose name I can’t find, unfortunately)  as part of a 20 minute performance.

 

Also took in two interesting short films called Born with it and Blasian Narratives about Black-Asian kids’ experiences. I’d never heard the word “Blasian” before.

Listened to a wonderful shakuhachi player who resides on the Sunshine Coast.  Alcvin Ryuzen Ramos, is one of the leading teachers and performers of the shakuhachi in North America who teaches at the Bamboo-In Retreat Centre.  His performance was exquisite and a rare treat. I love the breathy, haunting sounds of the shakuhachi, an instrument that may be the hardest instrument to learn taking years of mentorship and practice.

And of course George and Noriko, a crowd favourite. He’s known as the Japanese cowboy and she’s the Tsugaru shamisen player. Together they have a fun and unique sound. 

Taiko. Walking tours. Ikebana. Martial Arts. My god. It’s a veritable trip to Japan without the hell of the long flight.

Must do a shout out to Leanne Dunic (seated in photo) who led the curation in her first year as the new artistic director.  It’s been a busy year for her. She’s a writer, singer and multi-instrumentalist who plays with the band The Deep Cove. Her book To Love the Coming End published by Chin Music Press was released this year as well.  The weekend was awesome and it didn’t cost a dime. The only thing wrong with it was that I didn’t win the trip to Japan for two or dinner for six put on by Hapa Izakaya restaurant chefs.

Travel blogging the humanity of connection

Miniature felted yurts

For quite a few years now, I’ve been following the blog of this wonderful young artist and writer named Candace Rose Rardon. She is an all-round creative entrepreneur who travels the world sketching and writing. By birth, she is an American and by choice she is a citizen of the world.

Some time in 2012 or later, she lived in a yurt on Salt Spring Island for a while and I too love yurts arising from the first time I experienced a yurt in Northern New Mexico. I was out with two other women who were staying at Ghost Ranch at the same time as I was. We were driving around sightseeing and we stumbled upon this yurt on the side of the road. Intrigued, we hopped out and descended upon it only to be met at the door by a guy who was inside.  I don’t actually recall much about him but you can see him in the photo below.

dsc_0691

A yurt in Northern New Mexico near the Chama River.

Following her experience of living in a yurt on Salt Spring, Candace wrote a fantastic post about yurts the world over.

Her dreams have unfolded as she’s utilized her double whammy talents of writing and sketching to make connections in very organic, free flowing and serendipitous ways.

Recently she was doing a giveaway on her blog that got an overwhelming response from readers who shared their travel tales with her as a way to entice her into picking them as the recipient of a newly published anthology.

Here’s her original post for that giveaway of the Lonely Planet Travel Anthology.

She was overwhelmed by responses. In a follow up post, she decided to draw a map and put the names of all who contributed onto the map that she sketched so inspired she was by readers’ responses.

It’s such a great idea. You can see the map in her follow up post, The Geography of Connection. Readers’ comments were associated with 36 countries across five continents.

I submitted something related to my half day cycling trip to the Silk Islands off Phnom Penh.

Congratulations on your exciting news of being published in Lonely Planet’s literary edition for 2016. In 2013, on a trip through Thailand and Cambodia, I ended it in Phnom Penh and decided to go on a 1/2 day cycling excursion with Grasshopper Adventures. It meant arriving at the bike shop and gathering with a small group, getting a designated bike and helmet before heading off on a busy street right in the middle of the city which, at first, seemed very dangerous. Our guide was a young Cambodian woman who was really enthusiastic and we took off, traffic all around, which was a little scary and quite exhilarating. Luckily the ride to the ferry was very short (no more than 15 minutes) and once on the ferry we made our way across the Mekong to what are known as the Silk Islands.

It was so great to be on a bike, and to learn that a very rural existence was a mere ferry ride (10-15 minutes) away from the bustle of Phnom Penh. I loved the feeling of riding down an empty dirt lane way and as I passed by, little children would run out from their huts and yell “Hi” or “Hello” to us in English and we’d yell back. It was such a happy experience. Afterwards, we went to a silk farm, had a delicious fruit feast, and then on to another place with a temple and really unique wooden carvings that were quite ancient.

I felt like it was the S.E. Asian version of cycling a Southern Gulf Island in B.C., a place near and dear to my heart. We rounded it off with a feast at a local spot that, of course, our Cambodian guide knew would be really decent. A great day. A lasting memory.

Candace ends the blog post by saying, “There’s a lot happening in the world right now that would lead us to believe how disconnected we are from each other—but if this map says anything, I believe it’s that connection is real, alive, and important to us all.”

And that’s how you actually make blogs interactive. Something that I’m sorry to admit I’ve failed at miserably.

Monday, however, is a good day for dreaming about the next getaway, and for me, that’s as close as a visit to Candace’s blog. Check it out!

Point Roberts day tripping leads to tiny adventure

On a somewhat regular basis I get an almost bubbling up of a need to get out and about. I want to go somewhere different, see new things or go back to places I’ve seen but I haven’t seen for quite some time.  More often than not, a whim hits me and I find myself headed out, alone, to seize the day, just wander, my camera in tow.

Now I know many people would find this unappealing. They wouldn’t have any desire to do such a thing on their own.

I’d been thinking about Point Roberts for a while. It’s a place I used to go many years ago with a friend on a semi-regular basis, especially on beautiful weekends in August. We’d drive across the border, unload our bikes and ride a regular route past the golf course, to the lighthouse park on the ocean, then on to the marina, and farther along to that great little South Beach enclave down Crystal Beach Road. There’s a bench there with two flags painted across the back — a maple leaf and the stars and strips. Or there used to be.

We’d linger a while on a beautiful summer day under the reach of a lone Arbutus growing almost horizontally out from the cliff and we’d eat our snacks. We’d jump back on the bikes and head down the big hill to Boundary Bay, meandering along the beach and then finally head back up the ginormous hill, weaving across the road back and forth, all our effort required to not have to push our bikes up the hill, jubilant if we reached the top intact.

We’d usually stop at the end of the day for a drink at the little place with the great patio called Brewsters.

Now, perhaps the idea of a middle aged woman just wandering and not having a specific reason to be going anywhere, especially in this day and age where every minute of the day is prescribed with deadlines and activities and usefulness extraordinaire is just too strange for border guards. Maybe it was the fact that I was alone and when they peeked into my passport it showed that I’d been to Thailand and Cambodia a few years back. Maybe it was just completely random. I got handed a gold sheet that had the letters NNS written on it and was told to report inside. I got asked a few questions, the border guard typing madly as I answered. I’d love to know what he was putting in there. “Needs to dress better.” “Looks like a hippy”. “Crazy chic on a walkabout?” Whatever.

He wanted to know when I had last been to the U.S. He wanted to know what I did for a living. Good question, I thought. “Was I picking up a package?”  I answered them all with appropriate humbleness all the while wondering, if I was up to no good, why couldn’t I just pick a package up in Canada? I’m so innocent in matters of criminality that I can’t even figure out how it works.  Would I stand on the shoreline while someone in a boat threw me a package? Crazy! Least likely person to be up to no good. Put that in your computer.

colddayAnyway, with my passport handed back, I wandered a bit down at the beach. It was cold. I decided to check out Brewsters. I was seated beside a couple and the wife immediately started to talk to me.

Turns out they’d been high school sweethearts in Whittier California (they’d met at a youth center and he had to dump his girlfriend at the time AND he still felt bad about that). Imagine. He still felt bad. Fifty years later. That part was the most amazing to me.

They now reside in Bellevue,Washington. They are selling the place they’ve owned in Point Roberts for 10 years. He has a heart condition and at some point had to be airlifted back to Bellingham. I learned there is such a thing called helicopter insurance in case you’re in need of a helicopter to airlift you quickly to a hospital. I wonder if they have that in Canada.bluedoor

We chatted throughout lunch and she invited me back to see her garden. Of course, I took her up on the offer and got the full tour, including of the house. I learned they make garden ornaments from old china they collect and that they sell those in the summer at the Point Roberts Market, vendors totaling about five. I learned she’s a thrift store, garage sale aficionado.beeplate

Because they are selling their place – two bathrooms, three bedrooms – for $169,000 (US) she has begun putting prices on all the stuff she wants to unload in preparation for a big garage sale.  And as we toured the house, I came across this beautiful little oak dresser with a swivel mirror and instantly fell in love. She has put my name on it. dresserIn the meantime, does anyone want to buy  a pre-fab house in Point Roberts that’s in great shape? If not, perhaps you have $899,000 Canadian to purchase the waterfront property of their neighbors, Canadians who live in Tsawwassen, but who are selling their 10 acres on Pender Island.

It was the kind of day I love. I ventured out on my own feeling a little melancholy and in the venturing, I managed to find myself a little close-to-home adventure and that was exactly what I was hoping for.

PS: I didn’t feel like I wanted to ask them for a photo, so that’s why there isn’t one.