Putting the Phabulous into Photography in Vancouver

The other night I went to this photography event as part of the Capture Photography Festival. Organized by CAPIC, it was a survey of some photographers working in Vancouver, many of whom had apparently graduated from Langara in the past, and it was really interesting not only to hear their eight minute talks but to see the projects they were focused on. Literally!

David Duchemin

http://davidduchemin.com/

Spoke about recent findings of mirror neurons in the brain and how that means just seeing a photograph, not being there in person, may be enough to enable us to find a “string of empathy” to engage our compassionate hearts and to think about what justice might look like for other people. What might justice look like for all people, especially those we appear to be most unlike on the surface, finding a way to recognize that all humans, at the core of their humanity, are similar.

Angela Fama

http://angelafama.com/

To me this project was the most interesting of the evening. It was a project where she asked people how they were as she photographed them at a car-free event on Commercial Drive.  “No, really, how are you?” Then she captured their expression while she asked them to really think about that question and answer it honestly. And she spoke about building community and a cross country trip she’s about to embark on as part of a wabisabibutterfly.com project.

Vince Hemingson

http://www.hemingsonphotography.com/

In his own words, he didn’t really want to be there that night, which (editorial comment) is a less than ideal way to present oneself at an event.  Regardless, he showed his Nude in the Landscape photographs which he said was focused on form in landscape. I was intrigued by how fluidly he fit them into the landscape and I personally was fascinated by the detail of how he’d position a finger or a toe, slotted into a piece of driftwood in such an exquisite manner. I’m sure others will find these photographs enticing for their own reasons. Not sure why they had to be beautiful women only (as defined by mainstream impossible standards of beauty) if the point truly was just about the forms and shapes but take a look. Read the artist statement.

Alex Waterhouse-Hayward

http://www.alexwaterhousehayward.com/

He had an old camera around his neck and I enjoyed the way he just put up his photos and let them communicate. There seemed to be an inordinate number of people in the audience who had a problem with silence that lasts more than 30 seconds. I don’t get that. Embrace it!

Katie Huisman

http://www.katiehuisman.com/

Interesting personal discussion while dropped into a project to photograph sex trade workers in Uruguay. She realized she was putting a fashion filter (her normal bread and butter photography) on these women in this environment that was foreign to her and it wasn’t until she started to photograph the rooms without the women in them, that she was really able to capture their realities, to find a way to let their experience, stark and human, reveal itself through the empty rooms.

Pooya Nabei

http://www.pooyanabei.com/

A fashion photographer, relatively new to the field, who’s into the night scene and some interesting images that portray the interesting clubbing types he spends his time with.

Ross Den Otter

http://www.nuovofresco.com/home.html

Documenting development signs and how streetscapes have changed and continue to change focused on capturing those places in the city that we take for granted and putting boundaries around the parameters of where he’s choosing to shoot that which is near Main and Hastings.

There was the beginning of a little energized discussion around photographs on the web and stock photography and how it has impacted the industry with the typical dividing line between those who got it, accepted it and have capitalized on the “new reality” and those who are still fighting it.

I really loved experiencing the range of photographs and personalities that were there that night. I was struck by how much these photographers were the image-related version of  The SFU Writer’s Studio, each trying to promote connection as they defined that.

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